A Travellerspoint blog

The Thai Jungle

Featuring Hill Tribes, Elephants and Rafting

35 °C
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Sorry there hasn't been a blog for a while, I've not really had much wifi access and had no access to a computer to upload photos until now, even now the computer is so old and slow it's taking forever. Anyway...

On Wednesday 9th May I set off from Chiang Mai on A Hill Tribe Trek to go deep into the Thai jungle for 3 day and 2 nights. Wearing my walking boots, khaki trousers, explorer hat and my day pack filled with essentials I felt just like Bear Grylls. In actual fact Chiang Mai is awash with companies offering Trekking trips so it's maybe not quite as adventurous as it might sound. My trek was booked through my guesthouse for 1500b (£30).

Our group of 14 plus guide and a driver crammed into a pickup truck for the 2 hour ride into the hills, it was a good chance to start getting acquainted. In my group where 2 girls from Salford - Lisa and Vicky, a group of 5 friends on an epic journey across Asia after finishing uni - Lucy, Louise, Luca, Emma and Alice, plus 3 Koreans and 3 older (and not very sociable) french people.

Before starting out to the Hill Tribe village we first had an elephant ride, 20 minutes sat on the elephants back as its trainer (sat on the elephants head and using his feet on the elephants ears to steer) took us down some terrifyingly steep hills to a river for the elephant to drink. I did have a few doubt about the ethical nature of riding an elephant whose sole purpose is to give rides to tourists, but it was still an incredible experience to be so close to such an immense creature, plus they are all ex logging elephants so would probably just be abandoned if it wasn't for this type of activity.Elepahant ride

Elepahant ride

After the elephants came the start of the hard work, a 5 hour hike, all uphill in the the scorching afternoon heat, or as our guide Moonshine, liked to call it, exercise time. Stopped of at a waterfall half way up and everyone got under the water fully clothed in order to cool down and freshen up. Further up still we stopped at what the sign called a '7 Eleven' but what was in actual fact a Father and his three boys by the side of a stream with a few bottles of water and cans of coke for sale.Hill Tribe kids selling drinks at 1000m up a mountain

Hill Tribe kids selling drinks at 1000m up a mountain

With the sweat pouring from everyone we reached the hill tribe village just before the thunder and lightening started and the rain came down in bucketfulls. Perched at 1000m up and with spectacular views across the surrounding hills it was well worth the effort.

Meeting with the tribe was slightly underwhelming as they're clearly very used to having westerners passing through so there was no amasement at the sight of 14 bedraggled westerners arriving. We ate Thai curry and rice as the sun quickly disappeared and the thunder storm continued all around, then sat around a fire and were entertained by one of the locals surprisingly good renditions of several western songs on his guitar. A large spider crawling amongst us caused some alarm but it was quickly scooped away by our guide with guarantees that it wasn't dangerous. Still, I was slightly on edge for the rest of the night in fear that a huge spider could be crawling all over me. The rain was so heavy that the tribes woman host had to do some emergency patchwork to the roof of our hut to stop the rain flooding through, she very resourcefully used the cardboard from the box of Chang Beer we were all drinking.

After a slightly sleepless night, what with the fear of spiders, the lashing rain, the bamboo floor sticking through the bedding and the snoring French, we were greeted with an incredible view of surrounding mist shrouded mountains.View from our hut of the misty mountains in the morning

View from our hut of the misty mountains in the morning

Picking wild Lychees for breakfast

Picking wild Lychees for breakfast

Ate egg and toast for breakfast then said goodbye to the people only doing one night and headed deeper into the jungle in search of some waterfalls. The second day was less uphill, but more challenging terrain requiring bamboo walking sticks which our guide chopped for us using his machete. After 3 hours the first waterfall was bliss as we all dived into the water to once again wash off the sweat and cool down.Luca and Louise jumping from the waterfall

Luca and Louise jumping from the waterfall

Waterfall

Waterfall

Another hike and another waterfall but by this time it had started to rain so we quickly went on to our stop for the night, a bamboo hut by the river. The toilets were no more than holes in the ground with a little bamboo around for (very little) privacy. The shower hut was similar and consisted of a bucket to pour water over yourself, I had no problem with this and was quite getting into the spirit of it all until the giant spider was spotted in there. I had a wash in the river instead. Bet Bear Grylls isn't such a wimp when it comes to spiders. Another meal cooked on the open fire by our guide was followed by a few beers around a campfire. Slept much better on the second night because I was just too exhausted to care about creepy crawlies and the uncomfortableness. The final day mercifully only involved an hours trekking as the heat was back to scorching. A spot of white water rafting and bamboo rafting were a great way to end a brilliant 3 days.
Accommodation

Accommodation

Sleeping arrangements

Sleeping arrangements

Toilet and shower

Toilet and shower

Trekker Sean

Trekker Sean

Highest motorbike in Thailand?

Highest motorbike in Thailand?

Memorable quote from the trek "Oh My Buddha" as said by Moonshine every few minutes to express his shock, just as we would say oh my god.

Overall the trek as a great introduction to the jungle at a bargain price. So I didn't see much wildlife but I'm hoping that will come on my next jungle expedition in Laos, and the white water rafting was quite basic but there'll be plenty of opportunities to be more extreme in New Zealand.

Upon returning to the guesthouse I claimed my free massage (for booking through them) which was bliss. And a proper Thai massage this time with the masseuse using her feet, knees, elbows and all sorts to relieve my aching muscles. To top everything off I was then invited to join the guesthouses staff and Dave the English member of staff for a night out Thai style ... lets just say it involved copious amounts of whisky and a club where you get a massage as you use the toilet!

Posted by seanio5 02:52 Archived in Thailand Tagged mountains trek trekking elephants waterfall spider mist rafting bamboo hill_tribe Comments (0)

Chiang Mai

My favourite place in Thailand so far

semi-overcast 30 °C
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On Sunday (days of the week don't have the same significance when you are travelling as they do back home, Sundays in Thailand seem to be exactly the same as every other day of the week as far as I can tell) I said goodbye to my little luxury bungalow in Sukhothai and headed for the bus station for my next journey further north. The entire 6 hour journey was accompanied by heavy rain leaving some of the town we passed through under a significant amount of water, according to one local this is the start of a five day storm, well it is the rainy season so not entirely unexpected. One amusing sight on the way was an elephant going the other way on the back of a lorry, it made me think of Free Willie when they put the whale on the lorry to transport it. Other transport notes: the most people I have seen on a single motorbike so far is 4 - hoping for quite a few more than 4, and the word bus in Thailand can mean anything from the quite luxurious coach I got on Sunday to the ridiculously ancient pick up with 2 wooden planks in the back to sit on which was our (fortunately) short transport on Saturday.
Arriving in Chiang Mai at about 16:00, the rain still pouring, there were no tuk tuks vying for business, no touts desperate to lure you into their guest house. Instead I jumped in a pickup with some locals to get to the old town. I’m using a Kindle instead of old fashioned guide books which is great for saving space, the down side is the maps in LP are useless so I was unable to find any of the guest houses I'd intended to look at. Instead I settled for Kavil 2 on Mun Muang Soi 9, inside the old city.
Sunday night in Chiang Mai is market night, it's a shame I have to carry on around the rest of the world or I could have filled a suitcase with traditional souvenirs and beautiful home decorations here. Met up with Mark from New Zealand and a Canadian woman staying at his (much posher) guest house and went for a drink. On the walk back I encountered several rats, a cockroach and got my first few mosquito bites. In my room I discovered a mass of insects had entered, commando style under the gap at the bottom of the door. My mosquito net and sleeping sack both came out for the first time.
Food at the Sunday night market

Food at the Sunday night market


I must have been tired as I slept through till 11:00 despite the racket of motorbikes and market stalls just outside my open window. The first week has been incredible but also quite stressful, the hustle of Bangkok, the heat, the travel in a foreign country and the search each day for somewhere to stay that night. On the plus side, sorting all the various bits of travel and accommodation myself rather than booking it through an agency like most of the people I've met has saved a small fortune, and has given me a sense of pride at doing it all independently. Anyway, I decided to have Monday as a chill out day to just explore Chiang Mai, and boy is Chiang Mai the perfect place to chill out. Considering it is Thailand’s second largest city it could not be more different from Bangkok. Wondering through the tiny Soi (side streets) of the old city, exploring local markets, exotic temples with tranquil gardens, boutique shops, food stalls and tiny coffee shops, this is what I came to Thailand for. My favourite coffee shop so far is Funkydog Cafe on Soi 6, sat with a cup of local fresh hill coffee, a book and surrounded by the chilled out hippy decor and ambiance, I haven't been this relaxed in a long time. I've decided to stay in Chiang Mai a bit longer. The only dampener (literally) was the downpour in the late afternoon and throughout the night, my £1.20 poncho came in very handy.
Funkydog Cafe

Funkydog Cafe


Today, Tuesday, I signed up for one of Chiang Mai's specialties, an all day cooking class at Baan Thai Cooking School. For 800b (£16), or the price of a main course at a nice Thai restaurant back home, you get picked up (on the back of a moped), in a small group of 7 people (me, 2 Americans, 2 Chinese and 2 Maltese) you are taken on a tour of the local market to buy all the fresh ingredients, then you are given a choice of meals to make and eat. You choose a stir fry, an appetiser, a soup, a curry and accompanying paste, and finally a desert. You are shown by the wonderfully friendly staff how to cook each meal from start to finish, then you eat it and share what the other others in the group have made. I am now so full from the tastiest five meals I have ever cooked. I just need to try and remember everything for the next year until I get home to try them out again.
Selecting produce on the market

Selecting produce on the market

Spring Rolls - Made by me

Spring Rolls - Made by me

Pad Thai - Made by me

Pad Thai - Made by me

Hot and Sour Prawn Soup - Made by me (similar to Tom Yum, so i now know which bits to eat and which not to eat)

Hot and Sour Prawn Soup - Made by me (similar to Tom Yum, so i now know which bits to eat and which not to eat)

Panaeng Curry with Port and Sticky Rice - Made by me

Panaeng Curry with Port and Sticky Rice - Made by me

Deep-fried Banana - made by me

Deep-fried Banana - made by me


Tonight I’m off to the night bazaar to pick up a couple of essentials because for the next few days I’ll be off the grid and in the jungle.

Posted by seanio5 05:16 Archived in Thailand Tagged food bus market cooking chiang_mai chang_mai relax chill_out Comments (1)

The Old Old Capital

Sukhothai

semi-overcast 35 °C

I've already lost track of what day it is, I've been convinced today was Friday, oh well at least I can watch the FA cup final tonight (at 23:15 here!)

So yesterday was Friday and time to leave the old capital Ayyutaya amd head further north to the even older capital Sukhotahi. Whilst waiting for the 09:30 bus (which didn't arrive until 10:30) I met Will and Jasper, two 18 year olds who have just finished at boarding school, so you can guess they are quite posh. Then on the bus I luckily got sat next to the only other English speaker on there, Mark from New Zealand. One of the few things I've not been looking forward to are the long coach journeys but the conversation helped the six hours fly by. Along the way where a couple of stops to grab some food at the equivalent of a service station, more a market stall at the side of the road but the food was 100 times better than little chef.

After the noise of the hostel in Bangkok and the sauna of a fan room in Ayyuthaya I decided to splash out a little. The wooden bungalow at J&J guest house feels incredibly luxurious for the 500b (10 pound) a night it costs: air con, beautiful bathroom, massive bed and a lovely belgian owner. I thoroughly recommened anyone who ever finds themeselves in Sukothai to check this place out.

Over dinner at the guesthouse I got talking to my new Japanese friends, Kohei, 24, and his brother Yohei, 27. After a drink it was agreed we would spend teh day exploring Sukhothai together on Saturday. Before bed there was still time to meet my neighbours Emmanuel from Spain and Fanny from France. Sat on their verandour, translating between 3 languages we watched as a spectaluar storm rolled in and the lightning crashed down all around bringing with it a lovely cool breeze.

Today, Saturday, has been another great day of viewing spectacular ruins. I've seen enough Wats and Budha's in the last few days to last a lifetime, but when they are in such beautiful settings as this it's absolutely no chore at all. Was joined for the day by Kohei and Yohei, luckily they both speak preety good English, and once agin hired bikes to get around the large Histotorical Park andslightly further afield. I am glad to report that the temperature has dropped a touch up here, but we learnt it's still very easy to get a touch of sun burn (ouch, these tan lines are going to look rediculous when I get to a beach and take my t-shirt/vest off. Today I have also expereinced a new type of tuk tuk, in Sukothai they are called Sawngthaew, basically a moped with a cart strapped on the front with two benches on each side where you sit, so nothing between you and the road. The one we commisioned toget us to the historic parklooked like it and it's driver had been in service for at least 50 years.

Heading out soon to meet Mark and get some food before watching the game. Tomorrow I'm on the move again to Chiang Mai, the further north I get the more amazing Thailand is becoming, the people are so much friendlier, you don't feel like everyone is trying to rip you off like in Bangkok, and the scenery is just getting more and more stunning so here is hoping for more in Chiang Mai.
Sukhothai Budha

Sukhothai Budha

Sukhothai Ruins

Sukhothai Ruins

Me in Sukhothai

Me in Sukhothai

Monks praying in Sukhothai

Monks praying in Sukhothai

Sukhothai with mountains in background

Sukhothai with mountains in background

More spectacular Sukhothai

More spectacular Sukhothai

Posted by seanio5 06:20 Archived in Thailand Comments (1)

Wat, Wat, Wat?

Wednesday was a pretty baffling experience which left me quite confused and a little more skeptical than I was before.

Took the chance to get out before the heat got too unbearable ... only to find that it is already scorching at 07:30. Breakfast from a street stall was a kind of floury pancake with what I think was very sugary scrambled egg inside. Then headed out on a day of Wat seeing (Wat = Temple). As the main sites didn't open for a while the first stop was a wat just round the corner. Upon arriving I met a guide and got chatting, after revealing my plans he informed me that as it wa a holiday the main sites didn't open till 15:00. However the goverenment were doing a deal were licensed tuk tuks would only charge 10b for the whole day. Very skeptically I was bundled into a tuk tuk with a new schedule recommended by the guide for the first stop, Wat Benchamopitr. Not one I had intended to visit but was very much impressed with the beautiful setting and abundance of safron robed monks going about their morning rituals. Back to the tuk tuk who was still waiting an hour later and on to The Standing Budha, apparently the tallest Budha statue in the world. Next on to the Blue Budha, again very nice but I was getting the impression these weren't in the same league as The Grand Palace I'd been planning on seeing. Next stop, a suit tailors, you might have guessed were this is going, the deal with the cheap tuk tuk was you had to stop at a few businesses were they would try to sell you their products. I escaped the tailors, then a travel agents and then a gift shop (my protests each time that we should go back to the hostel were met with "just one more stop otherwise you pay full fare") so when we pulled up at another tailors I decided I would have to buy something or I'd be going round forever. The outcome of all this is that I am now the proud owner of a custom made, tailored shirt in fabric used by Armani. Amazingly it was delivered to my hostel last night. Cost of the shirt, 600b (about 12 pound), cost of the 3.5 hour tuk tuk journey and sites, absolutely nothing. On the epic trip I did see several other helpless foreigners being led from tuk tuk to tailor/jewelry shop etc.

At 15:00 I arrived at the Grand Palace just as thousands of people were leaving signalling that it hadn't been shut all day, I was now and still am uterly confused by it all. Note to self - don't believe anything anyone tells you in Bangkok, I think? Anyway, turns out it was a slight blessing in disguise, I got there just as everyone was leaving so avoided the crowds and the hour and a half before it shut was ample time to get around and see it all. The Grand Palace itself is a spectacular royal complex which also houses the Emerald Budha, the most sacred Budha in all Budhism. The whole complex is incredibly ornate and decadent, but the Emerald Budha for all the hype is actually a very small statue made of Jade. Next stop was acros the Chao Phraya river on a rather rickety but excellent value ferry - 3b (6p) each way - to get to Wat Arun. Another magnificent monument and as the sun set the dusk lighting made for some great photo's.

Back across the river for food at another sprawling market, this time my adveturous apetite got the better of me. I ordered Tom Yum, a spicy soup but when it arrived I was perplexed at which bits I was actually supposed to eat, I gamely tucked in eating anything which went down and picking from my mouth the huge chunks of ginger, bay leak and bamboo. The prawns with shell and legs attached and insides not removed were a step to far though. The good news is my stomach must be pretty resillient as there were no adverse reactions.

Back at the hostel, all my new found friends had packed up and headed off to the Full Moon Party at Ko Pang xxxx. To be quite honest I was glad of the quite night to plan my escape from Bagkok in the opposite direction.

Wednesday 2nd May - didn't sleep great last night first beacuse of the partying Brumies who'd been enjoying Khao San Rd, but also because I was quite apprehensive about my first day of 'real' independent travel. Up early again to get a taxi to Bankoks main train station for the 08:20 train to Ayutthaya. Third class ticket cost 20b (40p) for a 2 hour journey. Found a free seat surrounded by locals, monks, a few asian travellers but no westerners. Windows down and overhhead fan buzzing away we departed at snails pace through the urban sprawl of Bangkok. Seeing so many slums along the railway line as we passed really brought home just how poor many people in the city are.

Two hours later I peeled my sweaty backside from the leather seat and disembarked with most other people on the train. A quick boat across the river and I was in Ayutthaya, a small city north of Bangkok where 3 rivers meet and surround the city making an island. Ayuttaya is the the former capital of Thailand and was apparently one of the grandest cities in the world until the Burmese invaded and destryoed the entire city in the 18th century. There main attraction therefore are the incresibly pictuesque ruins.
Once on Ayutthaya I followed my guidebooks advice and set off to locate the tourist infomation office. From the map it only appeared a short walk so set off with all my worldly possesions strapped on. I must take after my Dad because the short walk turned into an arduous half hour trek in the hottest weather yet (I promise to stop writing about rhe weather soon but seriously, I was dripping from head to toe in sweat it was so hot). A tuk tuk rideback to near where I started and my first expereince of finding a bed for the night. It was actually far easier than I'd imagined, just up the road I spotted Tony's place which had decent reviews. For 200b (£4) I have a private room with double bed and fan. The shared bathrom leaves a lot to be desired but I was so exhausted I didn't care.

The afternoon was spent zipping from Wat to Wat on a hired yellow bike with basket on the front, but it's a really fun way to get around. The ruins are everywhere in the city but the main sites are in the central historic park which is lovely and quiete. I now have hundreds of photos of the spectacular remains of what must have been an incredible city before it was raise to the ground (don't have access to a computer here so can't upload any pics just yet).

After a delicious meal of Pan Fried Thai style noodles and chicken I'm having a very early night to catch up on some sleep - the hostel in Bagkok was great but the location near to Khao San is not conducive with gettimg much sleep.

Writing this on my phone with very limited wifi which is a bit difficult so appologies for any spelling mistakes or typos!

Posted by seanio5 06:28 Comments (0)

Sawadee Krap Cak Krungthep (Hello from Bangkok)

sunny 40 °C
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So I am finally here in Bangkok, the first stop on my year of travels.

Wow, Bangkok! What an amazing city - crowded, filthy, noisy, unbelievably big and almost unbearably hot, but I have loved every moment of it so far. The temperature at the moment is 40 degrees and there hasn’t been a cloud in the sky since I arrived (not to make you all jealous back in the UK), actually it is almost too hot at times but I'm not complaining, just acclimatising gradually.

Arrived on Monday on time and started searching for the bus I had been told to get to my guest house, after 30 minutes lugging my very heavy bag around a very hot airport I found out the bus had been canceled. Decided to take a taxi instead which cost 450 baht (less than 10 pond(this keyboard I'm using is all Thai symbols so can't find a pound sign)). This fist experience of Thai driving was interesting, the driver was incredibly talkative but unfortunately not very good at English. He didn't really know where my hostel was so proceeded to make a call, read a map, write directions and talk to me all whilst driving along a 4 or 5 lane road with trucks and motorbikes swerving in from all directions.

Checked into my hostel and tentatively went to my room to see what a 16 bed mixed dorm costing 6 pond a night was actually like... I was pleasantly surprised by what I found, I have a bottom bunk, slightly larger than a single bed, with blinds to pull down for more privacy and mirror, power socket, light and locker. The guy in the bunk next to me introduced himself as Tom from Leeds, turns out he had been on the same flight as me from London, and also the same flight from Manchester!

Settled in, myself and Tom decided to go out and explore the local area at about 18:00. Walked around for a bit not entirely sure if we were on Khao San Road or not, turns out we weren't quite. For my first experience of Thai food I opted for a small stall/cart with a woman cooking up fresh Pat Thai in a large open wok - everything I had heard about street food is true, for less than a pound I had a plate of Chicken Pat Thai which tasted amazing. Whilst ordering food we met Neil, an extremely talkative scouser and Felix his quiet German friend who offered to show us Khao San Rd and get a drink. One drink quickly became several and we ended up partying in a bar until 2 in the morning with loads of other travellers.
Fisrt taste of Thailand

Fisrt taste of Thailand

Drinking on Khao San

Drinking on Khao San


Khao San Rd is the tacky, neon lit, centre for backpackers where you can buy anything and everything, where sex shows and prostitution are as widely available as neon bangles and fake football shirts. I'm getting quite used to politely saying no thank you, this is usually the end of things but not always - when I rejected an offer to see a 'Ping Pong' show I was told "Ah, what's wrong, you a cock sucker?" Nice!

Day 2 started slightly later than I had planned due to a small hangover but was still up and out in the heat again by 10:00. Decided to go off exploring other parts of Bangkok by myself so headed toward the Chao Phraya River to take a boat to the first stop. On the way I called into a friendly looking cafe for a croissant and coffee (90b). After taking a few snaps of Phra Suman Fort on the banks of the river I boarded the Chao Phraya Express boat, a 30 minute ride up the bustling river to Silom.

Silom is slightly more business orientated but every inch of footpath is still crammed with open shops and street stalls selling everything from food to traditional Thai clothing. After a good couple of hours wondering around I arrived at Lumphini Park. This is a beautiful oasis in the middle of the mayhem and skyscrappers. The park has a large lake and canals leading to it, with loads of trees perfect for sitting under to get out of the blistering heat, and Thai's enjoying cycling, foot/volleyball, tuba playing and much more.

After sitting for a while Thom, a former Thai boxing champion apparently, approached me and offered a massage, I was slightly dubious (offers of massages in parks sounds slightly George Michael) but all the locals where having them and I had been thinking about getting a Thai massage anyway and it only cost 200b for an hour so thought why not... Wow, I never new so may parts of my body could be clicked. Thom claims to massage Thai boxers at the nearby Silom stadium, I've no idea if this is true or not but my head, neck, shoulders, arms, legs and feet where incredibly grateful for his work.
Getting a massage in the park

Getting a massage in the park

Lumphini Park

Lumphini Park


Leaving the park I got a rice and omelette concoction from a stall which was again beautiful, and then took my first tuk tuk ride to Chinatown. The tuk tuk sped off so fast and weaved in and out of the traffic so fast that I feared for my life slightly at first, but obviously arrived safely. Chinatown in Bangkok is spectacular much like the rest of the city just with a Chinese twist - health stores selling dried snakes, seahorses, etc, stores selling flat cooked duck or dried pigs face, and like everywhere else huge amounts of food stalls creating wonderful changing aromas. Wondered through endless alleys and markets, coming across a beautiful temple by accident. It was a Thai holiday so the area was more packed than usual and very few westerners. Nothing here was in English so choosing somewhere to eat was slightly more tricky, but down a side street I was bundled onto a tiny table in the road with cars going past a matter of inches away. The food I ordered was some kind of chicken and rice I know that, but can't tell you what it was called?
Chinatown

Chinatown

Eating something? in the road in Chinatown

Eating something? in the road in Chinatown


A quick taxi and I was back to the hostel for 21:00. Met Tom again and went for a quick drink where we again bumped into Felix the German, but called it a night soon after in order to get to bed and make the most of my final full day in Bangkok. I'm currently having a rest between temple seeing but need to head out again so will write all about today in my next blog. Will also upload loads of pics to facebook and send a link next time.

Posted by seanio5 00:34 Archived in Thailand Comments (0)

First blog

Hello and welcome to my first ever blog. Hopefully this will be the first of many posts detailing my year of travels. For anyone who doesn't know, today, Sunday 29th April 2012 is the day I set of on a year of backpacking around the world. If everything goes to plan I will be visiting 9
countries - Thailand, Laos, Vietnam, Cambodia, Malaysia, Singapore, Australia, New Zealand and Fiji (or TLVCMSANZF) for short. The plan is to spend the first three month seeing all the amazing sights of South East Asia, then head down under for about 7 months to find some work and maybe learn to surf followed by a round trip tour of New Zealand before a final chance to top up my tan on the beaches of Fiji.

I'm writing this first blog whilst sat at Manchester airport waiting for my flight to Heathrow, from where I fly to Bangkok. Just said an emotional farewell to mum, dad and sarah. Incredibly excited at the moment as well as a little bit apprehensive, I think this is because at work I spend so much time organising every last minute detail of travel and hotels for actors
and crew, yet her I am myself heading out for a year of travel with only a few flights which need to change anyway and just three nights accommodation booked. The rest is a case of just see how it goes, a philosophy which is taking a bit of getting used to, but hopefully once I do get used to it it will be an extremely liberating experience.

Hopefully the map at the top of the page will allow you to keep track of where I am in the world, some of the dates are a bit provisional at the moment so I'll try to keep this updated. If anyone has any recommendations to do in the places I'm going they'll be much appreciated so do let me know.
So, fairwell to the UK, can't say I'm at all sorry to be saying good bye to this cold wet weather (the current temperature in Bangkok is 38 degrees, yickes). Bye!!!

Posted by seanio5 10:29 Comments (1)

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